Luxury villas in Spain & The Balearics

Spain mixes tradition with dynamism, secluded beach coves with avant-garde cuisine, and flamenco with castles and cult wines.

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Spain & the balearics VILLA HOLIDAY GUIDE

Interested in a luxury villa holiday in Spain? Once known chiefly for its long stretches of sand, blazing sun, and midday siestas, the country is no longer isolated from the rest of Europe. Modern Spain complements tradition with dynamic cities such as Barcelona and Seville, cutting-edge dining and design, cult wines in Catalonia, and a variety of adventure sports. Away from your luxurious Spanish holiday villa, you will still find grand castles, cathedrals, and the fiery rhythms of gypsy flamenco in Andalucía, but today Spain is a diverse and forward-looking nation—even in challenging cultural and economic times. Whatever your holiday style, booking one of our luxury villas is sure to offer a gateway to an exciting, eye-opening break, whether it’s your first visit or your fifteenth

Cities in Spain & the Balearics

Fancy staying in a Spanish villa that’s close to the buzz of a city? Spain has plenty of incredible destinations you’ll be able to explore. Smack in the middle of the country, the capital Madrid leads the way in high culture, with the Prado tops among a golden triangle of art museums. Barcelona, the Catalan capital, is its economic and political rival—and on the fútbol pitch as well. Travellers love its Gothic Quarter, urban beaches, and modernista architecture. The queen of Andalucía, Seville is a city of colourful folkloric traditions and a population as warm as the sun overhead. On Mallorca, Palma is the laidback island capital of the Mediterranean.

Seville, Spain skyline in the Old Quarter

Spanish countryside

Despite an economic divide between city and rural life, Spaniards are deeply connected to the slower way of life in el campo; its ancient villages and wide-open spaces. The rolling green hills and farmhouses of Catalonia’s L’Emporda region recall Tuscany. Olive groves, vineyards, and Moorish whitewashed towns crisscross Andalucía in the south; central Spain, the land of Don Quixote, is famed for its vast plains. For mountains, look north to the Swiss-like Picos de Europa or to the Sierra Nevada, for Europe’s southernmost ski resorts.

The beautiful Romanesque church of Sant Esteve from the 13th century outside the medieval walls of Peratallada in the county of Baix Empordà in Catalonia Spain

The Spanish Coast

It may seem like Spain invented beach tourism, beginning in the 1950's with the development of beach resorts along its five thousand kilometre coastline. Andalucía’s Costa del Sol became shorthand for inexpensive sun-and-fun holidays for northern Europeans; today it also draws affluent travellers from across the globe. Catalonia’s Costa Brava followed the south’s playbook, while also preserving many small coves and fishing villages. The Mediterranean beaches of the Balearic Islands are magnets for sun worshippers and party goers, while Spaniards tend to escape the summer heat by fleeing north to the coasts of ‘Green Spain’. Whichever location takes your fancy, you’ll be sure to find a beautiful villa near the beach, meaning you can make the most of Spain’s incredible coastline.

An old fishing boat stranded on the quiet beach Platja de Sa Caleta in Lloret de Mar, in the Costa Brava

Eating and drinking in Spain

Traditional dining in Spain means suckling pig roasted on the spit, paella and other rice dishes, and jamón serrano (cured ham), which inspires a cult-like reverence among carnivorous Spaniards. Avant-garde cocina de autor (haute cuisine) is the fashion among talented Basque and Catalan chefs, but Spaniards’ love for tapas and tavern-hopping—the tapeo—lives on. You will still find pitchers of fruity sangria at seaside restaurants; but Spanish wines, from Priorat to Jerez, are also some of the finest in the world. And if you don’t fancy eating out every night, you can pick up a wealth of fresh, aromatic, local ingredients at the country’s wonderful food markets to cook up in your villa. Or indulge in our additional cook service – particularly ideal for holiday villas for large groups and families.

Traditional Spanish tapas. Croquettes, olives, omelette, ham and patatas bravas

Family villa holidays in Spain

Our child and family friendly Spanish villas make a perfect base for your holiday, whether you prefer a villa by the beach or with a private pool to keep your group entertained. But if you’re looking for more adventure, you’ll be sure to find it in sunny Spain. There are plenty of family-friendly resorts around the country, such as the mainland areas of Costa Brava and Costa del Sol and the islands of Tenerife and Mallorca. The cities, particularly Madrid and Barcelona, offer a host of child-friendly museums and the extensive Spanish coastlines offer plenty of opportunities for playtimes on the beach. Plus there’s a variety of popular water parks, zoos and theme parks to keep your whole family delighted.

Family having fun in the pool

Nightlife and entertainment

Unrepentant night owls, Spaniards typically go out for cocktails and tapas, dine as late as 11pm, and head out from there. Dance clubs do not heat up until 3am, and afterwards revellers go for churros (fried dough) in Madrid, or stumble to the beach for sunrise in Mallorca and Ibiza. Spaniards’ love of music and dance overflows in intimate flamenco nightclubs, jazz bars, and opera houses. Almost anywhere you go after the sun goes down in Spain, you will find a scene.

Acoustic trio band performing on a stage in a nightclub

Arts and culture in Spain

Spain has overcome regional independent streaks to weave together a nation of distinct languages and cultures, from Catalonia to Galicia. Architecture junkies will delight in Roman aqueducts, Moorish palaces, Gothic and Renaissance churches, and Catalan Art Nouveau apartment blocks. The arts have always thrived, evidenced by Old Masters Velàzquez and Goya in Madrid’s Prado and namesake museums of the groundbreaking modern artists Picasso, Miró, and Dalí. For popular festivals, Spain has few rivals, from solemn Easter week in Seville to raucous Carnaval in Cádiz and the correfocs (running fireworks) of Barcelona’s La Mercé.

 

Park Güell in Barcelona, built by Antonio Gaudi.

Active pursuits

Spain’s fine weather, varied terrain, and abundance of water are an invitation to outdoor enthusiasts. Walkers and hikers find terrific trails from Mallorca to Andalucía, and the Mediterranean and Atlantic coasts beckon windsurfers, kite-boarders, and sailors. Spain has long been one of the world’s top golfing destinations, and Spaniards are almost as mad for cycling and skiing (in the Pyrenees and the Sierra Nevada) as they are for fútbol (football or soccer), the national sport. For keen swimmers, there’s an abundance of coastline, or we offer a range of villas to rent with private pools, so you can stay active from the comfort of your own, luxurious home away from home in Spain.

Kite surfing beach in southern Spain